Can You Figure Out the Navy Special Warfare Command Missions, Tasks & Assignments?

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE COMMAND (NAVSPECWARCOM)
Naval Special Warfare Command was commissioned on 16 April 1987 at the Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado, California, and is the Naval component to the United States Special Operations Command. The mission of Commander, Naval Special Warfare Command (COMNAVSPECWARCOM) is to prepare Naval Special Warfare forces to carry out assigned missions and to develop maritime special operations strategy, doctrine, and tactics. COMNAVSPECWARCOM exercises operational control of all United States-based Naval Special Warfare Command training, operational control of all United States-based Naval Special Warfare forces and responsibility for the training, equipping, supporting, and providing trained and ready forces to the combatant commanders. Commander, Naval Special Warfare Command is a Navy Flag Officer, a Rear Admiral.

Naval Special Warfare Mission
Naval Special Warfare (NSW), provides an effective means to apply counterforce in conjunction with national policy and objectives in peacetime and across the spectrum of hostilities from peacetime operations to limited war to general war. NSW forces focus on the conduct of the following five principal mission areas of special operations:

- Unconventional Warfare (UW)
- Direct Action (DA)
- Special Reconnaissance (SR)
- Foreign Internal Defense (FID)
- Combating Terrorism (CBT)

Additionally, NSW forces are involved in collateral activities such as Security Assistance, Anti-Terrorism, Counterdrug, Personnel Recovery, and Special Activities. NSW also provides maritime specific special operations to meet US Navy fleet-specific requirements.

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE PERSONNEL
Naval Special Warfare Officer
NSW Officers go through the identical Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) Training that enlisted personnel to attend at the Naval Special Warfare Center. Following BUD/S, it generally takes an additional six months to one year for an officer to become fully qualified. A Naval Special Warfare Officer can expect to spend his entire career in a variety of special operations assignments ranging from operational SEAL and SDV Teams to Joint Staffs, or Naval
Special Warfare Groups.

Navy Enlisted SEAL
The Navy enlisted SEAL is a highly competent and qualified member of the Special Operations Community. All Navy SEALs go through the six months Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL, (BUD/S), Training at the Naval Special Warfare Center. Upon completion of BUD/S, all SEALs attend Basic Airborne training and then report to their first operational SEAL or SDV Team. SEAL operators assigned to a SDV Team must also complete SDV school which is generally attended en route to, or within three months of arrival at their new command. As an essential part of their qualification process, all SEALs must attend a three month SEAL Tactical Training (STT) course at their gaining command where they further enhance their operational skills and fieldcraft. Upon completion of STT, SEALs are assigned to an operational SEAL platoon or SDV task unit for their initial operational assignment. The process of training, education, and qualification is continued throughout their careers through a combination of formal and informal processes including on-the-job skills training, and attendance at various service or SOF training commands, and civilian courses of instruction. Once qualified, an enlisted SEAL can expect to spend the remainder of his career in the special operations community.

Special Warfare Combat Craft Crewmember
Combat Crewmen are assigned to Special Boat Units to operate the various Special Warfare craft assigned to the SBUs. A Combat Crewman attends advanced training at the Naval Special Warfare Center and then is assigned to a SBU. Combat Crew members may be parachute qualified and may have specialized special warfare skills in addition to their Combat Crewman skills.

NAVSPECWARCOM ORGANIZATION
Naval Special Warfare units are organized, trained, and equipped to conduct special operations in maritime and riverine environments. They are deployed in small units worldwide in support of fleet and national operations. NSW provides an effective means to apply counterforce in conjunction with national policy and objectives in peacetime and across the spectrum of hostilities from peacetime operations to limited war to general war.

Naval Special Warfare Center
The Naval Special Warfare Center located on the Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado is the schoolhouse for much Naval Special Warfare training. It is a major component command of the Naval Special Warfare Command and is commanded by a NSW Captain (O-6). In addition to the 26 week BUD/S and nine-week Special Warfare Combatant Crewman (SWCC) courses, the Center also conducts advanced maritime special operations training for NSW and other service component SOF personnel. The Center maintains a detachment at the Naval Amphibious Base, Little Creek, Virginia for selected training of personnel assigned to commands on the east coast.

Naval Special Warfare Development Group
The Naval Special Warfare Development Group, located in Little Creek, VA., is commanded by a Navy Captain (O-6). It is a major component command of the Naval Special Warfare Command. The Naval Special Warfare Development Group provides centralized management for the test, evaluation, and development of current and emerging technology applicable to Naval Special Warfare forces. This command also develops maritime ground and airborne tactics for Naval Special Warfare and possible Department of Defense-wide application. Administrative control is with Naval Special Warfare Command.

Naval Special Warfare Groups
NSW Groups are echelon II Captain (O6) major commands established by NAVSPECWARCOM at NAB Coronado and NAB Little Creek to equip, support, and provide command and control elements and trained and ready SEAL and SDV platoons and forces to the geographic CINCs. NSW Groups ONE and TWO are organized into:

-Three SEAL Teams, comprised of eight 16-man platoons, which conduct reconnaissance, DA, UW, FID, and other operations in maritime or riverine environments.
-One SDV Team which operates and maintains submersible systems that deliver and recover SEALs in hostile areas and conduct reconnaissance and DA missions.
-NSW Units, which are small command and control elements located outside the continental United States, support other NSW forces assigned to theater SOCs or components of naval task forces.

Naval Special Warfare Command Combat Service Support Teams (CSST)
One CSST is assigned to each NSW Group to provide full-spectrum logistic support for designated SEAL Teams, Special Boat Units, NSW Task Groups/Task Units and/or special mission units. Tasking for each CSST shall include three primary mission elements:
-OPLAN/CONPLAN and crisis-action logistic planning and coordination
-In-theater contracting, small purchase and lease actions
-Comprehensive forward operating base support

Within these mission elements, the CSST is responsible for force embarkation, load-planning, multi-modal transport coordination, combat cargo handling, in-theater logistics coordination, Military Liaison Officer/Defense Attaché Officer liaison, exercise-related construction, infrastructure support, contingency engineering, expeditionary camp siting and development, camp maintenance, NBC decontamination, and defensive combat planning and execution.

Naval Special Warfare Task Groups and Task Units
Naval Special Warfare Task Groups (NSWTG), and Task Units (NSWTU) are task-organized, tailored in size and composition to the mission, and resourced from NSWG and subordinate commands. They may operate unilaterally, jointly, or in combined operations. Their mission is to provide command and control, administration, and logistic support for assigned units. OPCON of designated NSW forces may be assigned to a JSOTF or with a fleet commander to support fleet amphibious and/or strike operations. The NSWTG and NSWTU are flexible in size and composition. Several NSWTUs can be operationally subordinate to a NSWTG, or a NSWTU could report directly to a JSOTF if the scope of operations and size of the deployed force is limited.

Special Boat Squadrons
Special Boat Squadrons (SBR) are echelon II Captain’s major commands established by NAVSPECWARCOM at NAB Coronado and NAB Little Creek to equip, support, and provide trained and ready special operations ships and craft to the geographic CINCs. Each command is comprised of one or more active or reserve component Special Boat Units (SBUs) and CYCLONE Class Patrol Coastal (PC) ships.

Special Boat Units
Special Boat Units (SBUs) are organized, trained and equipped to operate a variety of special operations surface craft in both the maritime and riverine environments. Their unique capabilities in the littoral battlespace include the ability to transition from the blue water open ocean to beach landing sites, to operations within inland maritime lines of communication (i.e. the riverine environment).

Special Boat Unit Mission
The mission of an SBU is to employ, operate and maintain a variety of surface combatant craft to conduct and support naval and joint special operations, riverine warfare, and coastal patrol and interdiction.

Special Boat Unit Capabilities
The SBU is capable of infiltrating and exfiltrating forces, providing small-caliber gunfire support, conducting a coastal patrol, surveillance, harassment, and interdiction of maritime lines of communication, FID operations, deception operations, search and rescue operations, and armed escort.

Special Boat Unit Limitations
SBUs are limited in a range based on fuel, sea state, and currents. They are limited in size and amount of equipment and weapons that can be carried, require a support base or platform for an extended deployment, and require extensive air or sealift to deploy to a forward theater of operations.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Task Unit
The SDV Task Unit is an operational element employed to plan, coordinate, and command submersible systems operations from specially configured submarines equipped with Dry Deck Shelters (DDS). The SDV Task Unit is normally commanded by a SDV Team commanding officer or executive officer and comprised of one or more SDV or SEAL Platoons. When embarked in a submarine with DDS attached, the DDS platoon commander reports to the submarine commanding officer as a department head and does not fall under the operational control of the SDV Task Unit commander.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Task Unit Mission
SDV Units are organized, trained and equipped to operate and maintain combat submersible systems and conduct specialized missions utilizing the Dry Deck Shelter/Host Submarine as an insertion/extraction platform.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Task Unit Capabilities
SDV Unit capabilities include limited DA missions such as port and harbor anti-shipping attacks and raids. Special mission units, using the SDV from the DDS, or the DDS alone, can conduct a variety of DA missions in the maritime environment. SDV Task Units conduct hydrographic reconnaissance and other intelligence-gathering missions and infiltrate, exfiltrate, and resupply SOF.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Task Unit Limitations
SDV missions are limited in their speed and distance by propulsion systems, sea state, weather, and water temperature. SDVs can carry a limited amount of equipment. Extensive training is required to maintain proficiency in operational skills required to operate from the DDS. SDV Task Units require a host submarine as the optimum means of mobility to and from the objective area. SDV Task Units require a support base for extended employment. Specific logistics are required to support a SDV task unit that is unique to SDV Teams.

SEAL Platoon
The SEAL platoon is the largest operational element that will normally be employed to conduct a tactical mission. Multi-platoon operations should not be planned or conducted without extensive preparations and rehearsals. A SEAL platoon is normally commanded by a Navy Lieutenant (O- 3). A platoon consists of 16 SEALs and may divide into 2 squads or 4 elements. All SEAL platoon personnel are dive, parachute, and demolitions qualified.

SEAL Platoon Missions
SEAL platoons are organized and trained to conduct DA, UW, FID, SR, and CT operations primarily in the maritime and riverine environments. These operations include sabotage, demolition, intelligence collection, hydrographic reconnaissance, and training and advising friendly military forces in the conduct of naval and joint special operations.

SEAL Platoon Capabilities
SEAL platoons can destroy or sabotage enemy shipping, port and harbor facilities, bridges, railway lines, communications centers and other lines of communication in and around maritime and riverine environments. They can infiltrate and exfiltrate selected personnel by submarine, surface vessel, aircraft or land vehicle. They can conduct reconnaissance and surveillance in multiple environments. They can organize, train and assist US, allied and other friendly military or paramilitary forces in the conduct of special operations.

SEAL Platoon Limitations
SEAL platoons require specialized support for infiltration, exfiltration and resupply. SEALs are restricted in their ability to conduct sustained firepower, mobility, organic combat support, and combat service support assets. SEAL platoons are dependent on the theater Navy component or the JSOTF commander for logistic support. SEAL platoons are not equipped for sustained, direct engagements against enemy forces. SEAL platoons carry minimum amounts of equipment, munitions, and light armament consisting primarily of individual weapons.

SEAL Platoon Security
Surprise and freedom of movement are essential to the success of special operations. These vital factors are based on accurate and timely intelligence. Because of the nature of SEAL operations, all aspects of operational security should be diligently observed throughout the planning and conduct of operations. Information to friendly forces should be available only on a need-to-know basis. Negotiations with local political factions that are necessary for the performance of a SEAL operation should be carefully planned to preclude compromise.

Mobile Communications Team
The Mobile Communications Team is an operational component of the communications- electronics departments of the Naval Special Warfare Groups ONE and TWO. They are responsible for: (1) Providing operational communications support to SEAL Teams, SEAL Delivery Vehicle Teams, and to Special Boat Squadrons for deployed fleet and joint units; (2) Organizing, training, and integrating new equipment and developing tactics to provide the highest quality Naval Special Warfare communications operations and support; (3) Preparing, implementing, and reviewing communications plans in coordination with higher authority, Naval Special Warfare Command components and other fleet and joint units.

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE GROUP ONE
Naval Special Warfare Group ONE (NSWG 1) in Coronado, California, is one of the six major operational components of the Naval Special Warfare Command. It is commanded by a Navy Captain (O-6). NSWG 1 has under its operational and administrative control, SEAL Team ONE, SEAL Team THREE, SEAL Team FIVE, and SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE. Administrative control of NSWU-1 AND NSWU-3 is with Naval Special Warfare Group ONE. The group deploys Naval Special Warfare forces worldwide to meet the training, exercise, contingency, and wartime requirements of the theater Commanders. Naval Special Warfare Group ONE is capable of task-organizing to support worldwide commitments as a deployed Naval Special Warfare Task Group (NSWTG), as they did during Desert Shield/Desert Storm. NSWG1 geographically concentrates on the Pacific and Central Commands areas of responsibility.

SEAL Team ONE
SEAL Team ONE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational SEAL platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team ONE’s geographic area of concentration is Southeast Asia. SEAL Team ONE deploys platoons to Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE in Guam and conducts Deployments for Training (DFTs) throughout the Pacific and Central theaters.

SEAL Team THREE
SEAL Team THREE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team THREE’s geographic area of concentration is Southwest Asia. SEAL Team THREE deploys platoons to Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE in Guam aboard amphibious ships deployed to Seventh, Fifth, and Third Fleets, and conducts DFTs throughout the Pacific and Central Theaters.

SEAL Team FIVE
SEAL Team FIVE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team FIVE's geographic area of concentration is the Northern Pacific. SEAL Team FIVE deploys platoons to Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE in Guam, aboard amphibious ships deployed to Seventh, Fifth, and Third Fleets, and conducts DFTs throughout the Pacific and Central Theaters.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE
SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE (SDVT-1), is based in Pearl Harbor, HI. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has three operational SEAL Delivery Vehicle (SDV), Dry Deck Shelter (DDS) Task Units and a headquarters element. Each SDV/DDS Task Unit is designed to operate independently from a host submarine in the conduct of Naval Special Warfare missions. SDV/DDS Task Units normally deploy only aboard host submarines, but may be deployed from shore or surface ships. SDVT-1 conducts operations throughout the Pacific and Central commands geographic areas or responsibility.

Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE
Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE, (NSWU-1), is based in Guam. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it consists of a headquarters element and has operational control of SEAL platoons and Special Boat Unit Detachments from the Naval Special Warfare Group ONE and from Special Boat Squadron ONE that forward deploy to NSWU-1 on a six month rotational duty. Currently, NSWU-1 maintains operational control of five forward deployed SEAL platoons and two SBU Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RIB) Detachments. NSWU-1 is under the administrative command of Naval Special Warfare Group ONE, but operationally reports to Special Operations Command, Pacific and US Navy Seventh Fleet for operational tasking. NSWU-1 provides operational support to forward deployed platoons and conducts theater planning for contingencies and exercises for Naval Special Warfare forces in the Pacific area of operations. NSWU-1 is capable of forming the nucleus of a Naval Special Warfare Task Unit (NSWTU).

Naval Special Warfare - Group ONE Detachment Kodiak
Detachment Kodiak is located in Kodiak, Alaska. It is a small training command consisting of a six man training cadre that specializes in training SEAL platoons and Special Boat Unit Detachments in maritime cold-weather operations. Units train in long range maritime navigation, across the beach operations, and other cold weather operations.

Naval Special Warfare Unit THREE
Naval Special Warfare Unit THREE (NSWU-3), based in Bahrain and under the administrative control of NSWG-1, is commanded by a NSW Commander (O5). It consists of a small headquarters element which forms the core of a NSWTU when deployed. It plans, coordinates, and supports the activities of SEAL platoons and SBU detachments deployed to the US Central Command, exclusive of those organic to amphibious ready groups (ARG) and carrier battle groups (CVBG). In view of the maritime character of the area of responsibility and nature of the operations supported, day to day OPCON is exercised by COMNAVCENT. OPCON may be shifted to Special Operations Command, Central (SOCCENT) when required by operational tasking.

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE GROUP TWO
Naval Special Warfare Group TWO (NSWG-2), located in Little Creek, VA, is the one of the six major operational components of the Naval Special Warfare Command. NSWG-2 is commanded by a Navy Captain (O-6). NSWG-2 has under its operational and administrative control, SEAL Team TWO, SEAL Team FOUR, SEAL Team EIGHT, SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team TWO, Naval Special Warfare Unit FOUR and Naval Special Warfare Unit TEN. Administrative control of Naval Special Warfare Unit TWO and Naval Special Warfare Unit EIGHT is with Naval Special Warfare Group TWO. The group deploys Naval Special Warfare forces worldwide to meet training, exercise, contingency, and wartime requirements of the theater Commanders. Naval Special Warfare Group TWO is capable of task organizing to support worldwide commitments as a deployed Naval Special Warfare Task Group, NSWTG, as they did during Operation JUST CAUSE. Naval Special Warfare Group TWO geographically concentrates on the Atlantic, Europe and Southern Command areas of responsibility.

SEAL Team TWO
SEAL Team TWO, is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team TWO’s geographic area of concentration is Europe. SEAL Team TWO deploys platoons to Naval Special Warfare Unit TWO in Germany, aboard Amphibious Ships deployed to Second and Sixth Fleets, and conducts deployment for training, (DFTs) throughout the European theater. SEAL Team TWO is the only SEAL team with an arctic warfare capability.

SEAL Team FOUR
SEAL Team FOUR is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has ten operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team FOUR’s geographic area of concentration is Central and South America. SEAL Team FOUR deploys platoons to Naval Special Warfare Unit EIGHT in Panama, aboard Amphibious Ships deployed to Second Fleet, and in support of the annual UNITAS cruise, and conducts DFTs throughout the Central and South American theater. SEAL Team FOUR is the only SEAL Team with a viable standing language capability, Spanish.

SEAL Team EIGHT
SEAL Team EIGHT is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team EIGHT’s geographic area of concentration is the Caribbean, Africa, and the Mediterranean. SEAL Team Eight deploys platoons with carrier battle groups (CVBGs) and amphibious ships in support of Second, Fifth, and Sixth Fleet commanders, and conducts DFTs throughout the Caribbean, Africa, and the Mediterranean littoral.

Naval Special Warfare Unit TWO
Naval Special Warfare Unit TWO (NSWU-2) is based in Stuttgart, Germany. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it consists of a headquarters element and has operational SEAL platoons and Special Boat Unit Detachments from the Naval Special Warfare Group TWO and from Special Boat Squadron TWO that forward deploy to NSWU-2 on a six month rotational duty. Currently, NSWU-2 maintains operational control of two forward deployed SEAL platoons and a Special Boat Unit RIB Detachment. NSWU-2 is under the administrative control of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO, but operationally reports to Special Operations Command, Europe for operational tasking. NSWU-2 provides operational support to forward deployed platoons and conducts theater planning for contingencies and exercises for Naval Special Warfare forces in the EUCOM theater of operations. NSWU-2 is capable of forming the nucleus of a Naval Special Warfare Task Unit, NSWTU.

Naval Special Warfare Unit FOUR
Naval Special Warfare Unit FOUR (NSWU-4) is based at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico. Commanded by a Navy Lieutenant Commander (O-4), it consists of a headquarters element and an integrated Special Boat Unit Detachment. NSWU-4 is a training command that provides training support to SEAL platoons, SDV Task Units, Special Boat Unit Detachments and other Special Operations Forces conducting training in the Puerto Rico operational areas. NSWU-4 is under the operational and administrative control of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO.

Naval Special Warfare Unit EIGHT
Naval Special Warfare Unit EIGHT (NSWU-8) is based in Rodman, Panama. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it consists of a headquarters element and has operational SEAL platoons from Naval Special Warfare Group TWO that forward deploy to NSWU-8 on a six month rotational duty. Currently, NSWU-8 maintains operational control of two SEAL platoons and Special Boat Unit TWENTY-SIX. NSWU-8 is under the administrative control of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO, and operational control of Special Operations South and Atlantic Fleet, South. NSWU-8 provides operational support to forward deployed platoons and conducts theater planning for contingencies and exercises for Naval Special Warfare forces in the SOUTHCOM theater of operations. NSWU-8 is capable of forming the nucleus of a Naval Special Warfare Task Unit, NSWTU.

Naval Special Warfare Unit TEN
Naval Special Warfare Unit TEN (NSWU-10) is based at Naval Station Rota, Spain. Commanded by a NSW Commander (O5), it has three operational SDV Task Units and a headquarters element. SDVT-2 conducts operations throughout the US Atlantic, Southern, and European commands. Its mission is to provide tactical type training opportunities for NSW forces deployed aboard Sixth Fleet ships during slack periods while on routine deployments, so NSW forces can maintain perishable skills. NSWU-10 is responsible for all NSW exercises conducted in Spain. NSWU-10 is under the operational and administrative command of Naval Special Warfare Group TWO. NSWU-10 conducts close coordination with Special Operations Command, Europe.

SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team TWO (SDVT-2) is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has three operational SDV/DDS (Dry Deck Shelter) Task Units and a headquarters element. SDVT-2 conducts operations throughout the Atlantic and Southern, and European command geographic areas of responsibility. SDVT-2 places special emphasis on providing the Sixth Fleet Commander a SDV/DDS capability.

SPECIAL BOAT SQUADRON ONE

Special Boat Squadron ONE (SBR-1) located in Coronado, CA is one of the six major operational components of Naval Special Warfare Command. It is commanded by a Navy Captain (O-6). Special Boat Squadron ONE has under its operational and administrative control Special Boat Unit ELEVEN, Special Boat Unit TWELVE and four Patrol Coastal Class (PC) ships, USS HURRICANE (PC-3), USS MONSON (PC-4), USS SQUALL (PC-7), and USS ZEPHYR (PC-8). The Squadron deploys PCs and Special Boat Unit, SBU, detachments worldwide to meet training, exercise, contingency, and wartime requirements of theater Commanders. Special Boat Squadron ONE geographically concentrates on the Pacific and Central areas of responsibility.

Special Boat Unit TWELVE
Special Boat Unit TWELVE (SBU-12) is based in Coronado, CA. It is commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), and consists of a headquarters element and eight Rigid Hull Inflatable, RIB, Detachments. In addition, by the end of FY 98, SBU-12 will have 5 MK V Special Operations Craft, SOC, Detachments. Each Detachment normally consists of two boats with crews. SBU-12, supports open-water special operations missions for West Coast Naval Special Warfare forces and deploys detachments aboard amphibious ships, to Naval Special Warfare Unit ONE, and on DFTs throughout the Pacific and Central areas of operation. SBU-12 is under the operational and administrative control of Special Boat Squadron ONE.

SPECIAL BOAT SQUADRON TWO
Special Boat Squadron TWO (SBR-2) is based in Little Creek, VA and is one of the six major operational components of Naval Special Warfare Command. Special Boat Squadron TWO is commanded by a Navy Captain (O-6). Special Boat Squadron TWO has under its operational and administrative control Special Boat Unit TWENTY, Special Boat Unit TWENTY-TWO, and 9 Patrol Coastal Class, PC, ships. The PCs under Special Boat Squadron TWO are USS CYCLONE (PC-1), USS TEMPEST (PC-2), USS TYPHOON (PC-5), USS SIROCCO (PC-6), USS CHINOOK (PC-9), USS FIREBOLT (PC-10), USS WHIRLWIND (PC-11), USS THUNDERBOLT (PC-12) and USS SHAMAL (PC-13). SBU-26 reports administratively to Special Boat Squadron TWO. The squadron deploys PCs and SBU detachments worldwide to meet training, exercise, contingency and wartime requirements of theater Commanders. Special Boat Squadron TWO geographically concentrates on the Atlantic, Southern and Europe areas of responsibility.

Special Boat Unit TWENTY
Special Boat Unit TWENTY (SBU-20) is based in Little Creek, VA. It is commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), and consists of a headquarters element and 13 Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB), detachments and two MK V Special Operations Craft, SOC, Detachments. By the end of FY98, SBU-20 will have 5 MK V SOC Detachments. Each detachment normally consists of two boats. SBU-20 supports open-water special operations missions for East Coast Naval Special Warfare forces and deploys detachments aboard amphibious ships and to NSWU-2 and NSWU-10. SBU- 0 focuses on providing operational support to the European and Atlantic theaters of operations. SBU-20 is under the operational and administrative control of Special Boat Squadron TWO.

Special Boat Unit TWENTY-TWO (SBU-22), is based in New Orleans, LA. It is commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), and consists of a headquarters element and 2 Patrol Boat Riverine (PBR) detachments, 2 Mini Armored Troop Carrier (MATC) detachments and 2 Patrol Boat Light (PBL) detachment. Each detachment normally consists of two boats with crews. SBU-22 is mainly a reserve organization with over 70% of the command being Naval reservists. SBU-22 focuses on providing riverine support in Southern and European theaters of operations. SBU-22 is under the operational and administrative control of Special Boat Squadron TWO.

Special Boat Unit TWENTY-SIX (SBU-26) is based in Rodman, Panama. It is commanded by a Navy Lieutenant Commander (O-4), and consists of a headquarters element and 10 Patrol Boat Light (PBL) detachments. Each detachment normally consists of two boats with crews. SBU-26 is dedicated to conducting operations in the riverine environment in support of the Southern commands theater of operations. SBU-26 is under the operational control of Naval Special warfare unit EIGHT and under administrative control of Special Boat Squadron TWO.

US Naval Psychological Operations Forces

The US Navy possesses the capability to produce audiovisual products in the Fleet Audiovisual Command, Pacific; the Fleet Imagery Command, Atlantic; the Fleet Combat Camera Groups; Naval Imaging Command; various film libraries; and limited capability from ships and aircraft of the fleet. A Naval Reserve PSYOP audiovisual unit supports the Atlantic Fleet. Navy personnel assets have the capability to produce documents, posters, articles, and other material suitable for SYOP. Administrative capabilities exist ashore and afloat that prepare and produce various quantities of printed materials. Language capabilities exist in naval intelligence and among naval personnel for most European and Asian languages. The Fleet Tactical Readiness Group (FTRG) provides equipment and technical maintenance support to conduct civil radio broadcasts and broadcast jamming in the amplitude modulation (AM) frequency band. This unit is not trained to produce PSYOP products and must be augmented with PSYOP personnel or linguists when necessary. The unit is capable of being fully operational within 48 hours of receipt of tasking. The unit’s equipment consists of a 10.6kw AM band broadcast radio transmitter; a broadcast studio van; antenna tuner; two antennas (a pneumatically raised 100-foot top-loaded antenna mast and a 500-foot wire helium balloon antenna); and a 30 kw generator that provides power to the system.

US Marine Corps (USMC) Psychological Operations Forces
The USMC has the capability to execute observable actions to convey selected impressions to support PSYOP objectives. This support may include aerial and artillery leaflet dissemination, combat camera documentation, and the use of motion picture projection equipment.

NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE WEAPONS SYSTEMS
Patrol Coastal Class Ship
Naval Special Warfare has taken control of 12 of 13 Patrol Coastal (PC) class ships. The PC class has a primary mission of coastal patrol and interdiction, with a secondary mission of Naval Special Warfare support. Primary employment missions will include forward presence, monitoring and detection operations, escort operations, non-combatant evacuation, and foreign internal defense.
The PC class operates in low intensity environments. Naval Special Warfare operational missions will include long range SEAL insertion/extractions, tactical swimmer operations, intelligence collection, operational deception, and coastal/riverine support. PCs will normally operate as a two boat detachment. This allows enhanced support and facilitates the assignment of one Mobile Support Team, MST, every two ships.

Design Characteristics:
Length: 170 feet
Beam: 25 feet
Draft: 7.8 feet
Displacement: 328.5 tons (full load)
Fuel Capacity: 18,000 gallons
Propulsion: 4 Paxman diesels (3350 horsepower each)
Generators: 2 Caterpillar (155 kilowatt each)
Steel hull with aluminum superstructure
Commercial sensors and navigation systems
Complement: 4 officers, 24 enlisted
Detachment: Berthing for 9-man SOF/law enforcement detachment
Performance Criteria:
Maximum Speed: 30 plus knots
Cruising Speed: 12 knots
Seaworthiness: Survive through sea state five
Max Range: In excess of 3000 nm (2 engines at 16 knots)
Armament:
MK 38 25mm rapid fire gun
MK 96 25mm rapid fire gun
Stinger Station
4 pintles supporting any combination of: .50 caliber machine guns; M60 machine guns;
MK 19 grenade launchers
Small arms
MK 52 Mod 0 chaff decoy launching system
Pre-planned product improvement: NSW RIB retrieval system

MK V Special Operations Craft
The MK V Special Operations Craft (SOC), is the newest craft in the Naval Special Warfare inventory. The MK V SOC primary mission is a medium range insertion and extraction platform for Special Operations Forces in a low to medium threat environment. The secondary mission is limited Coastal Patrol and Interdiction (CP&I), specifically limited duration patrol and low to medium threat coastal interdiction. The MK V SOC will normally operate in a two craft detachment with a Mobile Support Team.
The Mobile Support Team (MST) provides technical assistance and maintenance support during mission turnaround. The MK V SOC is fundamentally a single sortie system with a 24 hour turn- around time. The typical MK V SOC mission duration is 12 hours. The MK V SOC is fully interoperable with the PC ships and NSW RIBs. As such, all could be employed from a Forward Operating Base (FOB), in a synergistic effect. A MK V SOC detachment, consisting of two craft and support equipment, will be deployable on two USAF C-5 aircraft into the gaining theater within 48 hours of notification. A detachment is transportable over land on existing roadways. Detachments are not configured nor manned to provide their own security, messing, or berthing for personnel while forward deployed.

Design Characteristics:
Length: 81 feet 2 inches
Beam: 17 ft 5 3/4 inches
Draft: 5 feet
Displacement: 57 tons (full load)
Fuel Capacity: 2,600 gallons
Propulsion: 2 MTU 12V396 diesels (2285 horsepower each)
2 KaMeWa waterjets
Aluminum hull with five watertight compartments
Radar, full suite communications (HF, UHF, HF, SATCOM), GPS, IFF
Complement: 1 officer, 5 enlisted
Detachment: 16 SOF combat loaded operators with 4 CRRCs
Performance Criteria:
Maximum Speed: 45-48 knots for 250 nautical miles in Sea State 2
Cruising Speed: 25 - 40 knots Sea State 3
Seaworthiness: Survive through sea state five
Max Range: 500 nm (2 engines at 45 knots)
Armament:
Stinger Station
5 pintles supporting any combination of: .50 caliber machine guns; M60 machine guns;
MK 19 grenade launchers
Small arms
Pre-planned product improvement: Mounting stations for GAU-17 Minigun,
MK 95 Twin 50 cal machine gun, MK 38 chain gun
Rolling Stock per two boat detachment:
2 MK V SOC transporters
2 M9161A prime movers
2 M1083 5 ton trucks
4 M1097 HUMMVs with S250 shelters
1 five-ton forklift

River Patrol Boat
The River Patrol Boat (PBR), is designed for high speed riverine patrol operations in contested areas of operations, and insertion/extraction of SEAL Team elements. More than 500 units were built when first introduced in the Vietnam conflict in 1966 although the current inventory is 24 craft. They can be transported in C-5 aircraft on skids. The PBR is heavily armed and vital crew areas are protected with ceramic armor. The weapons loadout on this craft includes both single and twin .50 caliber machine gun mounts, 40 mm grenade launchers and small arms. The hull is reinforced fiberglass with two Jacuzzi type waterjet pumps for propulsion. The unit can operate in shallow debris filled water. The craft is highly maneuverable and can turn 180 degrees and reverse course within the distance of its own length while operating at full power. Engine noise silencing techniques have been incorporated into the design and improved over the years. The combination of relatively quiet operation and its surface search radar system make this unit an excellent all-weather picket as well as a shallow water patrol and interdiction craft.

Design Characteristics:
Length: 32 feet
Beam (including guard rails): 11 feet 7 inches
Weight: 8 3/4 tons
Draft: 2 feet
Propulsion: 2 GM 6V53N Diesel Engines (215 horsepower each)
2 Jacuzzi 14YJ water jet pumps
Radar, VHF/UHF Radios
Complement: 4 crew and 6 passengers
Fiberglass-reinforced hull
Performance Characteristics:
Speed: 24 Knots
Seaworthiness: Sea State 3
Max Range: 300 nm at full speed
Armament:
Standard:
Twin mount. 50 cal machine gun
.50 cal machine gun, stand mounted
MK19 40 mm grenade launcher
Options:
40mm/.50 cal machine gun, stand mounted
60mm mortar
M60 machine guns

Mini-Armored Troop Carrier
The Mini-Armored Troop Carrier (MATC) is a 36 foot all-aluminum hull craft designed for high-speed patrol, interdiction, and combat assault missions in rivers, harbors, and protected coastal areas. The MATC has a large well area for transporting combat equipped troops, carrying cargo, or for gunnery personnel operating the seven organic weapon stations. The MATC propulsion system is similar to that of the PBR, with an internal jet pump, which moves the water on the same principle as the air breathing jet engine. This type of propulsion is especially appropriate for beaching operations. A hydraulic bow ramp is designed to aid the insertion and extraction of troops and equipment. The craft has a low silhouette which makes it difficult to detect in all speed ranges. The unit is extremely quiet, particularly at idle speeds. A high resolution radar and multiple communications suite, provides a good all weather surveillance and command and control presence for interdiction and anti-smuggling operations. The overhead canopy can be removed or stowed below. Crew size is normally four but can be modified depending on the mission and mission duration.

Design Characteristics:
Length: 36 feet
Beam (including guard rails): 12 feet 9 inches
Draft: 2 feet
Displacement: 12.5 tons
Propulsion: 2 GM 8V53N diesel engines (283 horsepower each)
2 Jacuzzi 20YJ water jet pumps
Aluminum Hull, flat bottom
Radar, VHF/UHF Radios
Complement: 4 crew and 8 passengers
Performance Criteria:
Maximum Speed: 25+ knots
Seaworthiness: Sea State 3
Max range: 350 nautical miles
Armament:
7 pintle mounted weapons to include .50 caliber, M-60, MK 19
60 MM mortar

Light Patrol Boat
The Light Patrol Boat (PBL) is a lightly armed Boston Whaler type craft with no armor. This craft is constructed of fiberglass with reinforced transom and weapons mount areas. It is powered by dual outboard motors and is highly maneuverable. It is useful in interdicting a lightly armed adversary but should not be used to engage a heavily armed or well organized enemy. It functions effectively in policing actions, harbor control, diving and surveillance operations, riverine warfare, drug interdiction, and other offensive or defensive purposes.
The weapon mountings can include .50 caliber heavy machine guns or 7.62mm machine guns mounted on 180-degree mounts, providing an effective weapon employment in any direction. Due to its unique hull design, the PBL is excellent for the riverine environment, allowing it to operate in virtually any water depth. Its two low-profile engines are capable of providing eight hours of continuous operation at a fast cruise speed of 25-plus knots. It displaces 6,500 lb. fully loaded and is transportable via its own trailer, helicopter sling, or C-130 aircraft. Normal crew size is three personnel.

Design Characteristics:
Length: 25 feet
Max beam: 8 feet 7 inches
Draft: 18 inches
Propulsion: Twin 155-HP outboards
Fiberglass hull
VHF, UHF, and SATCOM Radios
Complement: 3 Crew and 8 passengers
Performance Criteria:
Speed: 30+ knots
Range: 150 nautical miles
Seaworthiness: Sea State 2
Armament:
3 weapons stations, one forward and two aft/ Combination of .50 cal, or M-60

Rigid Inflatable Boat
The Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) is a high speed, high buoyancy, extreme weather craft with the primary mission of insertion/extraction of SEAL tactical elements from enemy occupied beaches. The RIB is constructed of glass reinforced plastic with an inflatable tube gunwale made of a new hypalon neoprene/nylon reinforced fabric. There are two types of RIBs currently in the inventory, a 24-foot RIB and a 30- foot RIB. The RIB has demonstrated the ability to operate in light-loaded condition in sea state six and winds of 45 knots. For other than heavy weather coxswain training, operations are limited to sea state five and winds of 34 knots or less. The 24-foot RIB carries a crew of three and a SEAL element. A 30 Foot RIB, NSW RIB*, 10 Meter RIB carries a crew of three and allows for a SEAL squad delivery capability.
Design Characteristics:
24 foot RIB 10 meter RIB
Length: 24 feet 30 feet
Beam: 9 feet 11 feet
Draft: 2 feet 3 feet
Weight: 9,300 lb. 14,700 lb.
Propulsion: Single Volvo Penta Two Iveco Diesels with waterjets
Complement: 3 crew/4 passengers 3 crew/8 passengers
Radar, HF, UHF, VHF Radar, HF, UHF, VHF, SATCOM Radios
Radios
Performance Criteria:
Speed: 25+ knots 35+ knots
Range: 170 nautical miles 200 nautical miles
Seaworthiness: Sea State 5 Sea State 5
Armament:
Forward and After Forward and After Mounts
Mounts Capable of M-60 Capable of M-60, M-2, or MK 19

Combat Rubber Raiding Craft
The Combat Rubber Raiding Craft (CRRC) is used for clandestine surface insertion and extraction of lightly armed SOF forces. They are employed to land and recover SOF forces from over-the-horizon. The CRRC is capable of surf passages. The CRRC may be launched by air (airdrop/helo-cast), or by craft (LCU, LCM). It may also be deck-launched or locked-out from submarines. It has a low visual electronic signature, and is capable of being cached by its crew once ashore. It uses one 35-55 horsepower engine.
Design Characteristics:
Length: 15 feet 5 inches
Beam: 6 feet 3 inches
Draft: 2 feet
Weight: 265 lb. without motor or fuel
Speed: 18 knots, no load
Range: Dependent on fuel carried
Complement: 8 max
SEAL Delivery Vehicle MK VIII
The SEAL Delivery Vehicle (SDV) MK VIII is a "wet" submersible, designed to carry combat swimmers and their cargo in fully flooded compartments. Submerged, operators and passengers are sustained by the individually worn underwater breathing apparatus (UBA). Operational scenarios for the vehicle include underwater mapping and terrain exploration, location and recovery of lost or downed objects, reconnaissance missions, and limited direct action missions.

The vehicle is propelled by an all-electric propulsion subsystem powered by re-chargeable silver-zinc batteries. Buoyancy and pitch attitude are controlled by a ballast and trim system; control in both the horizontal and vertical planes is provided through a manual control stick to the rudder, elevator, and bow planes. A computerized Doppler navigation sonar displays speed, distance, heading, altitude, and other piloting functions. Instruments and other electronics units are housed in dry, watertight canisters. The special modular construction provides easy removal for maintenance. Major subsystems are Hull, Propulsion, Ballast/Trim, Control, Auxiliary Life Support, Navigation, Communications and Docking Sonar.

Dry Deck Shelter
The Dry Deck Shelter (DDS) allows for the launch and recovery of an SDV or combat rubber raiding craft (CRRC) with personnel from a submerged submarine. It consists of three modules constructed as one integral unit. The first module is a hangar in which an SDV or CRRC is stowed. The second module is a transfer trunk to allow passage between the modules and the submarine. The third module is a hyperbaric recompression chamber. The DDS provides a dry working environment for mission preparations. In a typical operation the DDS hangar module will be flooded, pressurized to the surrounding sea pressure, and a large door is opened to allow for launch and recovery of the vehicle. A DDS can be transported by USAF C-5/C-17 aircraft, rail, highway, or sealift. The DDS is 40 feet long and weighs 65,000 lb.

Current submarines capable of single DDS employment:
USS L. MENDEL RIVERS
USS BATES
Current submarines capable of dual DDS employment:
USS KAMEHAMEH
USS POLK
Design Characteristics:
Length: 39 feet
Width: 10 feet
Weight: 65,000 lb.
Volume: 3,705 cubic feet

Desert Patrol Vehicle
The DPV is correctly named the Desert Patrol/Light Strike Vehicle. It is a modified Chenowith off-road, three-man, 2x4 racing vehicle. The DPV was designed to operate anywhere a four-wheel drive vehicle can, with additional speed and maneuverability.

The DPV can perform numerous combat roles including, but not limited to: special operations delivery vehicle, command and control vehicle, weapons platform, rear area combat operation vehicle, reconnaissance vehicle, forward observation/lasing team, military police vehicle, and artillery forward observer vehicle. The weapon systems used with the DPVs are: Mark 19 40mm Grenade Machine Gun, M2.50 Cal Machine Gun, M60 7.62 Machine Gun, AT-4 Missile, Low Recoil 30mm Cannon, and TOW Missile Launcher.

Vehicle Specifications:
Prime Contractor: Chenowith
Acceleration: 0-30 mph in 4 sec.
Powerplant: 2000cc gas engine
Speed (max): 60+ mph
Payload: 1500 lb.
Range: 200-plus miles
Dimensions:
Length: 161 inches
Height: 79 inches
Width: 83 inches
Gross Vehicle Weight: 2700 lb.
Max Grade: 75%
Max Side Slope: 50%
Ground Clearance: 16 inches

Advanced SEAL Delivery System
The Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS) is projected to be in the Naval Special Warfare inventory by FY99. The ASDS is a dry, 1 ATM, mini-submersible that can transport a SEAL squad from a host platform, either surface ship or submarine, to an objective area. The ASDS has a lock-out chamber that is controlled by operators for lock-out from an anchored position. The ASDS will anchor above the bottom between 2-190 feet. The ASDS will be transportable by land, sea or C-5/17 aircraft.
Design Characteristics:
Length: 65 feet
Beam: 6.75 feet
Height: 8.25 feet
Displacement: 55 tons
Propulsion: 67hp electric motor (Ag-Zn Battery)

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